Best of FilmExodus: The Top 100 Reviews & Editorials of 2018 (50-26)

Reviews allow people a chance to get a feel of a film or television show before actually watching it. A well-written review can persuade a person to either see or avoid a film. There’s a sense of power in writing your opinion down on page and the feeling inside you is nothing you have ever felt before.

Editorials expand on this feeling. Instead of just reviewing a film, you are pulling apart and analyzing every single scene. The writer has to ponder why a director made this decision or shot this scene with that lighting. A good editorial can make the reader completely rethink a film he may have already seen countless times.

Starting last Monday, FilmExodus has been counting down its top 100 most viewed reviews and editorials of 2018. Enjoy.

Previous Installments: 100-76, 75-51.


50. The 100 Greatest Villains Of All Time List (30-21)

Sailor Monsoon | March 29, 2018

The Monomyth was first conceived by Joseph Campbell in his 1949 novel The Hero with a Thousand Faces. It is a literary term conceptualized by Campbell that details the stages of the hero’s journey. He identified a pattern throughout mythology and literature and condensed it down to seventeen stages. Hollywood executive Christopher Vogler would later edit it down to twelve stages and his version would be the blueprint that every film would use from then on. The Ordinary World, The Call to Adventure, Refusal of the Call, Meeting with the Mentor, Crossing the first Threshold, Tests, Allies and Enemies, Approach of the Innermost Cave, The Ordeal, The Reward, The Road Back, The Resurrection and The Return with the Elixir. | Read More >>


49. Let’s Talk About… This Is Us Season 2, Episode 17: “This Big, Amazing, Beautiful Life”

Joe Newman | March 11, 2018

In a bold move for the penultimate episode of the season, this entry revolves entirely around Deja, beginning with her birth to a 16-year-old Shauna with only her grandmother present with her and, of course, the doctors and nurses. She tells her that she was there for her mother and it feels like “déjà vu”, giving her yet-to-be-born granddaughter her name. Grandma is extremely happy to welcome Deja into this world and hold her, but her mother is not at all. She tries to get Shauna to hold her newborn daughter, but she is upset with whoever Dennis (probably Deja’s father) is and acting distant towards Deja because of him. | Read More >>


48. Road to Infinity: ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ (2017) Review

Joshua Martyniouk | April 23, 2018

I feel like sometimes I am living the life of Peter Parker. We both get good grades, are bullied every day for being unique, have nerdy friends, possess a “Spider Sense” when it comes to danger, and have everyday responsibilities in our lives. Sony’s history with Spider-Man has been very troubling, but I feel like Spider-Man: Homecoming was the hit Sony needed. Homecoming is the perfect Spider-Man movie. But, before we review that fantastic movie, let us talk about the impact Spider-Man left on my childhood. | Read More >>


47. Let’s Talk About… ‘Platoon’ (1986)

Mr. Poppity | April 24, 2018

I was more or less raised on war and time pieces movies. My father in particular loved (and still does) these old classics where all kind of acts of valor and gallantry would be displayed. The motto always seems to be: “This is the War. Do your duty for your country/world/planet.” And what do you know, good always prevailed. | Read More >>


46. The 20 Most Overrated Movies Of All Time (20-11)

Sailor Monsoon | December 3, 2018

There is nothing more pretentious than claiming something is “overrated.” Art is subjective, which makes the act of declaring one thing less deserving of acclaim over another thing, futile and silly. People like what they like and if enough people like a certain thing, it becomes popular. Simple as that. | Read More >>


45. Monsoon-A-Day ‘Black Panther’ (2018)

Sailor Monsoon | February 22, 2018

It’s impossible to talk about Black Panther without addressing it’s importance. This isn’t a film as much as it is a revolution. It will transcend the borders of the screen to actually change the world outside of the cinema. This isn’t the first black superhero film nor is it the first good black superhero film but this is the first one specifically designed to cater to children. The MCU has often been dismissed as nothing more than billion dollar toy commercials and while that’s not exactly untrue, toys connect to children. | Read More >>


44. Monsoon-A-Day: 2017 Year In Review (Part 1)

Sailor Monsoon | January 2, 2018

783. There was 783 films released in 2017. There’s a million reasons why 2017 was a colossal shit show for everyone on planet earth but there was at least 783 reasons why it didn’t. No matter how bad things get, film will always be there to offer an escape. Whether it’s the good, the bad or the ugly (see what I did there? I referenced a film while talking about film. That’s why they call me Oscar “Shakespeare” Wilde), film is an important distraction. These are the 58 films that helped distract me from the garbage fire that was 2017. | Read More >>


43. Lenz on Cinema: Returning from Vietnam

Mark Naff | October 29, 2018

In 1975, the last troops pulled out of Vietnam, officially ending the United States’ long and controversial involvement in the war. Unlike World War II, Vietnam’s legacy seemed much less heroic, due to the implications of the war. For years afterwards, the film industry felt scared to cover the war, and films often focused less on the actual war, and more on veterans returning home. | Read More >>


42. The 100 Greatest Villains Of All Time (50-41)

Sailor Monsoon | March 26, 2018

Just like how every script has a three act structure, every film that involves a hero on a quest can be broken down to these twelve elements. But that doesn’t mean that each step is important. The formula may be ironclad but there’s one step that’s far more crucial than the others and that’s step six: Tests, Allies, and Enemies. The hero can be uninteresting and the quest uninspired but if your villain is lame, nobody will remember. The hero is only as memorable as the villain he’s fighting. James Bond is one of the most iconic characters ever but the only films anyone gives a shit about are the ones where the villain is amazing. | Read More >>


41. FilmExodus Ranks the Marvel Cinematic Universe

FilmExodus Community | April 26, 2018

Tomorrow, Avengers: Infinity War, the culmination of 10 years worth of MCU movies, opens in theaters. In anticipation, the FilmExodus Community decided to go through the first three phases of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and rank the previous eighteen films by Marvel Studios. In case you missed it, in 2017 we ranked the Spider-Man and Star Wars films. In an instance where a film did not appear on a contributer’s list, a multiplier was applied to give each film a fair point total (not that it ended up helping one sequel). Also, you can click the film’s title to take you to its Road to Infinity review. Which film ended up where and why? Let’s find out, shall we? | Read More >>


40. Road to Infinity: ‘Marvel’s The Avengers’ (2012) Review

dnwilliams | April 9, 2018

In 2008, when Samuel L Jackson’s Nick Fury told Robert Downey Jr’s Tony Stark that he was part of a bigger universe, audience members did not dare dream of a universe that included everything from Rocket Raccoon and Ego the Living Planet to your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. None of that was on the table. What was on the table when Fury appeared at the end of Iron Man was a milestone superhero crossover movie. What we were being promised was The Avengers. | Read More >>


39. Road to Infinity: ‘Iron Man 3’ (2013) Review

Marmaduke Karlston | April 10, 2018

The post-Avengers landscape had an impact in the both the Marvel Cinematic Universe and our universe. For us, the idea of a cinematic universe became a must-have for a studio and within the next three years there was everything from a DC Extended Universe to a Sony Spider-Man Universe to a Transformers Universe to the Dark Universe. Frankly, it got a bit much. However, inside the MCU the impact was much more profound. The Battle of New York became their 9/11. | Read More >>


38. Horrific Scenes From Non-Horror Movies: ‘American History X’ (1998)

Vincent Kane | August 30, 2018

We all know that horror movies are supposed to be filled with well horror or scary scenes. So sometimes it can tough to truly shock viewers because they have seen it before or are simply ready and braced for something awful. However, there are times in non-horror movies where there are scenes that are more unsettling, intense, and horrific than the entirety of some horror movies. These scenes can catch the viewer off guard because they come at us unexpectedly or simply show the disgusting real side of life. | Read More >>


37. Bill Murray Goes to Japan: A History

Mark Naff | June 10, 2018

In the late eighties and early nineties, studios released a whole bunch of movies about American and Japanese relations. The Karate Kid (1985) and its sequels focus on a Japanese American karate master (Pat Morita) teaching American teenagers (Ralph Macchio, Hilary Swank) how to defend themselves. In Ridley Scott’s Black Rain (1989) and Phillip Kaufman’s Rising Sun (1993), Americans and Japanese must work together to solve a murder that leads them straight to the darkest parts of Japanese culture. | Read More >>


36. Monsoon-A-Day ‘The Cloverfield Paradox’ (2018)

Sailor Monsoon | February 5, 2018

In 2007, J.J. Abrams held a TED conference where he famously talked about the time his grandfather took him to Tannen’s magic shop in New York City where he was immediately captivated by a mysterious box riddled with question marks. It was a box containing magicians tricks such as playing cards, instructional pamphlets and the like but Abrams didn’t buy it for the tricks. He bought it for the mystery. | Read More >>


35. The Power of a Boring Film

Cap N’ Jack | January 2, 2018

Today I watched two films. One was Mimic, Guillermo Del Toro’s giant cockroach creature feature. The other was Thomas Alfredson’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. The latter is one of my favorite films but holds a unique place for me as a film that many people are incredibly bored by and I simply am not. I’ve heard that it’s dull and plodding from all corners. Member of our little film community have told me how much they struggled to enjoy it. My father gave up after less than ten minutes. A friend told me her roommate hated it with a fiery passion and thought it was trash (I went on to date that roommate for a summer–I should have known it was doomed). To put it simply, many viewers, of many tastes, find it to be a stale lifeless slice of drudgery in the guise of a spy thriller. | Read More >>


34. Road to Infinity: ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ (2014) Review

DryButSoupy | April 12, 2018

Set two years after the Battle of New York, Captain America: The Winter Soldier is the sequel to 2011’s Captain America: The First Avenger.  It continues the story of World War II super soldier Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) as he tries to find his way through the modern world.  Not only is it a strong sequel, but it is considered by fans and critics alike to be one of the best films set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to date. | Read More >>


33. FanCast: Which Actor Should Play Santa Claus That Hasn’t Yet?

Marmaduke Karlston | December 23, 2017

Tim Allen. Ed Asner. Fred Astaire. Richard Attenborough. Jim Broadbent. Tom Hanks. Leslie Nielsen. Mickey Rooney. William Shatner. Robert Wagner. The list goes on and on for actors who have portrayed actors in live-action or animation. Kurt Russell is set to join the list, as he has signed on to portray ole Saint Nick in an upcoming Christmas film for Netflix. | Read More >>


32. Road to Infinity: ‘Black Panther’ (2018) Review

Joe Newman | April 25, 2018

Let’s get one thing straight – Black Panther has always been awesome and was always underappreciated even by some comic readers. However, anyone who knew who Black Panther was knew that he was not only a badass, but arguably just as cool as Batman or maybe even cooler. From someone who became a comic fan (especially Marvel) at a very young age, it blows my mind not only that now everyone knows who Black Panther is and even more so that my Wakanda jokes won’t fly over anywhere near as many people’s heads as they used to. He also has no ties to the Black Panther Party and actually predates the formation of that particular party and it sounds way better than the serious alternatives of “Black Leopard” or “Coal Tiger”. | Read More >>


31. Road to Infinity: ‘Thor’ (2011) Review

SomewhereSomehowSometime | April 5, 2018

All my life I have been fascinated with myths. While still in grammar school, I read Bulfinch’s Mythology along with many comic books. So, of course, I was familiar with Thor. This movie is a great treat for those that love the Norse mythology, superheroes, comics, and movies. I hope with this review that I touch upon the broad strokes without really spoiling it for anyone who has not yet seen the movie. | Read More >>


30. The 100 Greatest Villains Of All Time (70-61)

Sailor Monsoon | April 20, 2018

The hero can be uninteresting and the quest uninspired but if your villain is lame, nobody will remember. The hero is only as memorable as the villain he’s fighting. James Bond is one of the most iconic characters ever but the only films anyone gives a shit about are the ones where the villain is amazing. From the mustachio twirling, train track tying ne’er-do-wells to mask wearing slashers to universe destroying uber baddies, cinema has had a long love affair with evildoers but which one is the most dastardly? | Read More >>


29. Let’s Talk About… ‘Nashville’ (1975)

Mark Naff | November 22, 2018

Robert Altman’s Nashville (1975) examines American life and all its messy problems. It’s about race relations, sexual politics, the generation gap, entertainment becoming politics, and so many other issues that face Americans every day. In his review of the film, Roger Ebert said it might be about how “we’re all in this together.” Like Network (1976), it predicted much of the modern world by writing about the then present. Unlike Network, it predicted a greater number of events, from the rise of third party candidates to the political candidacy of multiple entertainers. | Read More >>


28. What’s On The Grill? July 5th – July 11th

Vincent Kane | July 11, 2018

Welcome Exiles to this week’s What’s On The Grill?, the weekly mini-review corner where we get to blast about whatever we’ve caught recently, feasted on with our eyes as some say. This week on the grill: Some insect super hero fun, wacky dance battles in a post apocalyptic future, McConaughey’s creative use of fried chicken, and another post apocalyptic future with bad mullets and sword play. Enjoy! | Read More >>


27. Outsiders Living the American Dream: A Farrelly Brothers Retrospective

Mark Naff | June 29, 2018

In 1994, New Line Cinema released Dumb and Dumber, directed by Peter and Bobby Farrelly. Along with Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and The Mask (both 1994), it helped launch Jim Carrey’s career, but also launched the Farrelly brothers’ career and helped define the next fifteen years of mainstream comedies in Hollywood. Since then, the Farrelly brothers have tried every comedy possible with mixed results. At best, these comedies allow the audience to laugh at otherwise horrifying ideas about society. At worst, they come across as sophomoric and tasteless. | Read More >>


26. Lenz on Cinema: The Return

Mark Naff | November 19, 2018

While Kay Lenz has a long film career, television has played a role in her life that film never did. Her father, TV Producer Ted Lenz, gave Lenz her first role at eight weeks old on the TV show Hollywood on Television (1949-1953) (which also featured a young Betty White). Throughout her childhood, her father would cast her in multiple commercials and TV shows for children. Lenz’s first agent insisted she change her name, so she adopted the name Kay Ann Kemper as a teenager. She switched it back as an adult after her father encouraged her to. | Read More >>


Tomorrow… #25 to 1, and analysis!